Learning magic tricks can help kids with ADHD and boost self-esteem, study finds

This study examined a virtual magical summer camp program and observed how it improved the self-esteem of children and adolescents with ADHD.


A child with a magician's outfit doing a trick
via Pexels/Amina Filkin

A new study has found that children with ADHD can benefit from learning magic tricks and that it can boost everyone’s self-esteem. The idea of ​​magic and magic tricks is something that many children can relate to. Whether it’s just a hobby or something they watch on TV, it can captivate them and make them want to know more about themselves. Some children also like to learn how to do their own magic tricks, to amaze and amaze their family members and friends. Although it may be taken for granted by parents, there are good reasons to encourage this hobby.


According to Medical Xpress, a study was done that shows that learning to do magic tricks can help boost the confidence of children with ADHD. There are kids across the country struggling with ADHD, and the studies will always be there to point parents in the right direction with resources and support.

RELATED: Experts Agree Magic Tricks Boost Kids’ Creativity

The study was carried out by the University of Alabama at Birminghamand it can be read in full here. This study examined a virtual magical summer camp program and observed how it improved the self-esteem of children and adolescents with ADHD. It’s common for children with ADHD to have low self-esteem, so it’s important to find ways to help them.


Learning magic tricks has been found to promote motivation and improve psychological, perceptual, and social functions in children. The study involved 6 children aged 8 to 14 who participated in a virtual magic camp specially designed for children with disabilities. They met three days a week and classes lasted 1 hour and it lasted four weeks. Children completed pre- and post-camp assessments, and their parents participated as well.

What they found was that self-esteem scores at the end of camp were much higher than they were before camp began. The children themselves reported a higher sense of self-esteem, and parents said the camp had a positive impact on their child’s mental health and well-being.


Low self-esteem in children with ADHD can have a wide range of negative effects on a child’s development and life. So it can be a strategy that parents can use if their child is in pain. It may also indicate that more programs like this are being made available to families.

Sources: Medical Xpress, health psychology research


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Brian L. Hartfield